The Marks ; Spencer link

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy

The Marks & Spencer link was made at the launch of a charity and trade union-backed campaign, Labour Behind the Label, which aims to put pressure on retailers and international brand name firms to take action to ensure clothing production workers are paid a living wage, both in Britain and abroad. Another danger of increasing international trade is that it causes pollution. As the global economy grows the speed of industrialisation has resulted in the damage of the environment, the speeding up of global warming and air and also water pollution. There are a lot of arguments which emphasise the negative effects of globilisation on the environment. One of them is that if businesses are allowed to locate anywhere in the world why don’t they locate in less economically developed countries where the environmental standards are very low.

Marks ; Spencer are very good when it comes to pollution. They are already on the A list for its environmentally aware practices, and announced its “A Plan” to get even better. They will spend �200M over the next five years to implement their 100-point plan which includes making the supermarket carbon neutral and sending no waste to landfills by 2012. Already at the forefront, last year the top executives saw the film “An Inconvenient Truth” and Stuart Rose, the Chief Executive said “We believe a responsible business can be a profitable business. We are calling this “Plan A” because there is no ‘plan B’.”

The plan covers five areas, including fair trade –offering more Fairtrade products and making 20M garments a year out of Fairtrade cotton (an extension of their existing commitment). They will reduce their use of packaging by 25% and use packaging materials from sustainable or recycled sources. Already cut back, it will now become fully degradable, using cornstarch derived plastic. Stores will also test composters which will produce biogas from out of date food and other waste. The retailer will buy as much food from the UK and Ireland as possible; doubling the amount with the next twelve months. Interestingly, they will decrease the amount of food flown in and label imported food as ‘flown’.

Another danger for international trade is protectionism. There is a danger that countries will take on protectionist policies which are designed to support their own services and their own products. Protectionism distorts international markets and stops countries from enjoying some of the benefits of international trade. When countries adopt protectionism there is a danger that foreign governments may retaliate which could cause a war over trade. There are some people who argue and say that the west uses double standards when they trade with less economically developed countries.

Protectionism is the economic policy of restraining trade between nations, through methods such as tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, a variety of restrictive government regulations designed to discourage imports, and anti-dumping laws in an attempt to protect domestic industries in a particular nation from foreign take-over or competition. This is closely aligned with anti-globalisation, and contrasts with free trade, where no artificial barriers to entry are instituted.

Tagged In :

Get help with your homework


image
Haven't found the Essay You Want? Get your custom essay sample For Only $13.90/page

Sarah from CollectifbdpHi there, would you like to get such a paper? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out