Financial times

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The fifth question I asked was ‘do you buy the Financial times?’. The reason I chose to ask this question was because I wanted to know out of all those who buy shares how many of them bought the financial times to keep on track with news about their company. If I was to redo this question it would almost impossible to improve it because it is a question, which can only be asked in one way. Out the people I interviewed 85% said the do buy the Financial Times.

Those 85% were those who bought shares, this tells me that the majority of the people who buy shares would tend to buy the Financial Times. Whereas the 15%, which said, they do not buy shares did not buy the Financial Times were those that had not bought shares. This tells me the Financial Times is mainly bought by people who buy shares mainly because it is the easiest way to keep on track with the company you invested in. This is a graph showing my results.

The sixth question I asked the sixth question I asked was ‘have you ever made a profit or loss?’. I chose to ask this question because I wanted to find out how many of those who bought shares made a profit or a loss or even both. If I were to redo this question I would not change anything because I assume it can only be asked in one way. For this question there was four different answers. 40% of those I asked said both, 25% said just profit, 20% said just loss and 15% said neither. This 15% were those who had not bought any shares. I found out that most of the people had made a profit and loss. I also found out that the least number of people said neither. This is a graph showing my results for this question.

The seventh question I asked was ‘is there anyone that you know that has bought shares?’. I chose to ask this question because I wanted to find out how many of the people I interviewed who had friends or relatives that invest in shares. I also wanted to know an approximation of how many people invest in shares. After when getting my results to this question I found out that most people nowadays at least buy shares once. For this question there was only two answers. 90% said that they had friends or relatives that had bought shares and 10% said they did not. This tells me that most of the population know someone who has bought shares. This is a graph showing the results for this question.

The eighth question I asked was ‘Do you think there is more of a chance of making a profit than a loss?’. I chose to ask this question because I wanted to find out how many of those people who had bought shares and those who did not thought there would be more of a chance of making a profit than a loss. For this question they was only two possible answers. After gaining my results I found out that the most number of people I interviewed thought that they would be more of a chance of making a profit.

Out of those I interviewed 60% said they thought there is more of a chance of making a profit and 40% said they thought there was more of a chance of making a loss. If I was to redo this question instead of giving a possible yes or no answer I could have used fractions, for example I could have asked what fraction of the time do you think you could make a profit?, 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, 1. if I had asked the question in this way I think I would have obtained more accurate results. This is a graph showing my results.

The ninth question I asked was ‘what is your socio-economic group?’. I asked this question because I wanted to find out the socio-economic groups that buy shares. This question was a question, which could only be asked in one way, so if I was to redo it I would not be able to make any improvements. For this question there were six possible answers. The reason there was six answers is because there is only six different socio-economic groups.

Out of all those I interviewed 30% said they were in group A. Group A is the upper middle class, this involves jobs like higher managerial, administrative or professional such as doctors. 15% said they were in group B. Group B is the middle class, this involves intermediate managerial or professional such as teachers. 15% said they were in group C1. Group C1 is the lower middle class, this involves supervisory, administrative, junior managerial or professional such as shop assistant. 15% said they were in group C2.

Group C2 is the skilled working class, this involves skilled manual workers such as carpenters, cooks and train drivers. 5% said they were in group D. Group D is the working class, this involves semi-skilled and unskilled workers such as store keepers. 0% said they were in group E. Group E is the poorest in society, this involves state pensioners or widows, casual or lower grade workers, or long term unemployed. This is a graph showing my results.

The tenth question I asked was ‘what is your occupation?’. I chose to ask this question because I wanted to find out what sorts of jobs those who invest have. This question was probably the least accurate question of the ten questions I asked. This question had only five possible answers. 15% were businessmen/women, 5% were doctors, 15% were teachers, 15% managers and 50% said other. If I was to redo it I could have listed more jobs to obtain more accurate results. I could also have just provided a bit of space for the person to put in the name of the job, this way I would get very accurate results. The graph below shows my results.

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