Charity advertisements

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The two adverts I am going to compare are a R.S.P.C.A Christmas advert for the prevention of cruelty to animals during the Christmas period and an Oxfam advert for needy countries ravaged by famine and poverty. Purpose Though both adverts are for different types of charity both have the same purpose, which is to gain peoples attention and appeal to them for donations to fund their work. They do this as neither company receive funding except for what the general public give to them so adverts like these are needed to help the company achieve its goals. They both ask for monthly donations the adverts purpose is to gain these they do this by considering the audience and writing in styles to appeal to this audience specifically.

Audience the adverts differ in who they try to appeal to the R.S.P.C.A advert uses a simple story of a cat being saved after almost being drowned, children who called the police who contacted the R.S.P.C.A saved the cat. The story is written in simplistic language in a similar style to a fairy tale of a damsel in distress (the cat) being saved by a shining knight (R.S.P.C.A worker) this gives me the impression it appealing to families with children.

The Oxfam however is a clear cut advert stating the facts of the ravaged company of Africa with figures about death by aids and death by famine per year it follows up with a straight out plea for donations. This tells me that it is aimed at an older age group, as it would not appeal to children however adults can see the seriousness of the troubles. Though both adverts both appeal to different audiences they appear in broadsheet newspapers, which mean they are probably aimed at people of a medium social class. I think this because people who buy broadsheet papers tend to be working people with a high intellect who may also have a bit of time on their hands as most normal class people buy tabloid papers mostly for entertainment and a quick read.

Writing style The R.S.P.C.A uses emotive language that is a bit simplistic this I think is to appeal to family whilst the Oxfam uses straightforward language with no story but just facts appealing to adults. They use different styles of writing as the R.S.P.C.A is more likely to appeal to children then adults as It includes animals, kids love animals. However a child may not be interested in the story of a young Ethiopian boy dieing of starvation and. Also the fact that the R.S.P.C.A advert has a happy ending is also to prevent from causing children from becoming disheartened which would lose the adverts appeal while the Oxfam uses facts about the number of deaths which is not a particularly good subject for children it also may be a little out of their comprehension.

Presentation Both adverts are laid out similar they both have a large picture a donation box and two columns of writing, however the Oxfam one has an addition of large headline of factual statistics “37% of people in Ethiopia will die of aids another 41% will die of starvation” while the R.S.P.C.A has a slogan “To prevent cruelty and promote kindness to animals.” Both use these to attract attention. However the Oxfam headline is more hard hitting and presents itself stronger then the R.S.P.C.A advert.

Final comparison Though both adverts have many similarities such as the appeal for donations and need for funding they are very different adverts this is because they need to appeal to different audiences to get their point across, I think both averts achieve their goals quite well both use emotive typesets with ideas of more deaths without the companies. However they are both very different organisations and so need to present themselves in different ways.

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